Tag Archives: Politics

The hustings – a short story

10 Aug

‘Welcome to a packed town hall in Birmingham for what promises to be a titanic battle between these 4 candidates who seek to be leader of the opposition and possibly the future resident of number 10,’ the new political editor said as she eagerly introduced her first big political event. 
‘Lets introduce the candidates. Candidates, you have a time limit of 45 seconds to introduce yourselves to our audience.’
‘My name is candidate A and I seek to become your prime minister. In these tough times for all hard working families, we need to create robust growth in our economy by promoting more green shoots. We mustn’t be afraid of telling hard truths, and the truth is we can’t just oppose. We need to change our party to change our nation into an aspiration nation. We need to bring back aspiration to our nation. I believe I can bring this aspiration.’
‘Hello and thank you for watching, I’m candidate B and I aspire to work hard to improve the lives of all those hard working families across the country. I grew up in a hard working household and I know that hard work should pay off. I aspire to bring back aspiration.’
‘Good evening, I’m Candidate c . I say that it’s not enough to aspire while I was a minister the last time we were in government I opened sure start centres that work hard to support hard working families. We need aspiration of action not just to talk about aspiration.’
‘I’m Candidate d . This unprecedented financial crash has changed the rules of the game. I seek aspiration for all not just the privileged few. I also want to work hard to oppose these loathsome policies and represent those working hard for their families. Austerity isn’t just an abstract concept and neither will aspiration be. ‘

The crowd applauded, the kind of applause that seemed to convey a mentality of ‘ I better clap or else it would look very impolite.’
Caroline from Kent asked the first question. ‘What would you consider to be your priorities?’

Candidate A’s eyes lit up as she responded. ‘My priority is aspiration. I seek to create a society where all hard working families can aspire to live a better life. Though we also face some hard truths and we need todo whatever it takes to aspire to grow those green shoots of our economy.’
Candidate B fluttered his eye lashes as he pondered his response. ‘I agree with candidate A as I too aspire to bring back aspiration. As you all know (yes we do know I thought), I grew up in a hard working household and I aspire to make this country work hard for the hardworking. I also agree somewhat about the hard truths…..’
Sorry to interrupt,’ candidate D said in a loud voice, ‘ but candidate B, didn’t you state the other day that you agree with me that you would seek to oppose harsh policies of the government and oppose austerity?’
‘Yes I did but I also agree with candidate A too, this is my aspirational vision.’ Candidate B responded, seemingly oblivious to the contradiction in his soundbite response.

Candidate C spoke in a calm but dispassionate manner. ‘My priority is to begin the work I started when I was a minister which included sure start, and other measures to help (you guessed it) hard working families. I call this aspirating to act.’
Candidate D added in his loud voice, ‘I seek to reopen the mines as I feel this is a great way to aspire to create a fairer society. I aspire to work hard for those families who work hard….’
It carried on in this vein after many questions asked. I switched off. Not one question answered. I wanted to be inspired, but I was just tired of the same vacuous slogans of aspiration and hard working families. Tired of keyboard warriors for each candidate ripping lumps out of each other.

As I watched the show unfold, I was reminded of the end of George Orwell’s Animal farm. I looked from candidate A to D, from D to A, but already it was impossible to say which was which. 

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Cross in the box

22 Feb

 

cross in the box

Cross in the box

With election fever raging, I have created another free ebook of political poetry, called ‘Cross in the box.’

One such poem in the collection is this call for young people to register to use their ‘voice’ at the ballot box in May.

Use your voice

Use your voice,

Don’t lose your voice,

Your voice was not a gift given

But a right fought for,

Suffered for,

Died for

Your right of choice denied to so many.

You claim

that they’re all the same

But they will only hear those who use their voice,

Who make their choice.

If you want to change the world,

You need not be a philosopher,

A rich man, nor politician,

Put a cross in the box,

Make your choice,

Use your voice,

Don’t lose your voice.

The future can change,

The land can slide,

With only the sound of your voice.

 

 

 

A new politics

17 Feb

A new politics

We need a grown up politics
Not a Punch and Judy
‘He said she said’,
Playground politics.

We need substance over style,
We see bluster,
Filibuster, while we dream,
We call for
A new
A real politics.

We need a change,
A revolution in thinking politics,
A ‘get things done’ politics.
A politics truly of the people
for the people,
‘Not just for ambitious people’ politics.
A new politics.

Demagogue

30 Apr

Beware ye of the demagogue
rabble rouser.
He may shout
play on fear,
tell you want you want to hear.
Look closer,
nothing there but hot air.

Beware ye of the demagogue,
From crisis they spring,
A sirens song they sing,
Quick to find a scapegoat,
Demonise,
They blind you with their lies.

Beware ye of the demagogue
rabble rouser.
He may be everywhere,
He may shout
play on fear,
tell you want you want to hear.
Look closer,
nothing there but hot air.

State of the Nation UK

17 Feb

My fellow countrymen,
This nation’s in a state,
A hole that greed and selfishness helped to create,
Those in gold and silver wealthy,
But piss poor morally.
Those for so long above a law they disobeyed,
They played by their own rules.
One law for those in pinstripes,
Another for those in adidas stripes who face demonisation,
Derision,
For failing to hunt down the elusive prey of a job.
Broken Britain was your creation,
You’re smashing, dashing the hopes of young and old alike.
Maybe the recovery starts not with stats plucked from the air,
Maybe it begins when we start once again to care.

Clement Attlee, a politician with a poetic heart!

22 Jan

Some of you may know, others may be surprised (as I was) to learn that the great Clement Attlee was also a poet.

In 1909, he wrote this poem, Limehouse about the area he served as MP for 27 years until 1950.

In Limehouse, in Limehouse, before the break of day,
I hear the feet of many men who go upon their way,
Who wander through the City,
The grey and cruel City,
Through streets that have no pity
The streets where men decay.

In Limehouse, in Limehouse, by night as well as day,
I hear the feet of children who go to work or play,
Of children born of sorrow,
The workers of tomorrow
How shall they work tomorrow
Who get no bread today?.

In Limehouse, in Limehouse, today and every day
I see the weary mothers who sweat their souls away:
Poor, tired mothers, trying
To hush the feeble crying
Of little babies dying
For want of bread today.

In Limehouse, in Limehouse, I’m dreaming of the day
When evil time shall perish and be driven clean away,
When father, child and mother
Shall live and love each other,
And brother help his brother
In happy work and play.

This is a very direct poem addressing the very wretched lives of this part of the world, and as ‘Clem the Gem‘ states, “these are not the words of some prim and paltry lawyer, nor the vainglorious bombast of some posing buffoon.” In an age of apathy where many feel the identikit politicians are ‘all the same’, maybe we need another figure like Attlee, a poetic wordsmith who sought to describe the problems of his day, and by his actions follow up on his words to make positive change.

Many thanks to Mike Paterson and Clem the Gem .

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